Category Archives: Politics & Government

A Change is Gonna Come : A Movement Culture Callout

I feel deeply saddened and betrayed that things had to come to this , yet here we are .

I have always believed that silence is complicit to wrong doing . And for every time I shrunk myself in fear of being left behind , every time I plunged my teeth into my tongue and clenched my jaw , every time I became reactive – I made room for more harm (and I carry deep shame around this).

I will not be silent anymore.

There are people who Look like us that are Not fit to lead this Sacred Work. People who are well educated and versed in the ways of old capitalism and how white domination operates, that have themselves and families been subjected to these violent systems.
People who are fierce objectors of the police state yet actively and vehemently police Black Bodies . People who speak of healing and are still in an unhealed hurting state and frequency .

It pains me that greed can corrupt Anyone, and power lust can crush even the most revered and hopeful among us. It pains my spirit and soul that leaders so knowledgeable, so intelligent and empathetic can be soured by malice and hatred and take on the old tired shape of our oppressors .

This all cuts so deep and I promise this isn’t to be messy , to stir any pot but to invoke what (this city) Culture really is in need of :

Radical Honesty , Love and Compassion .

I judge no one for their actions . I ask for the sake of accountability Genuine Repentance and CHANGE of Behaviors.

I want to share my experience for the youth :
the baby organizers, the yg’s in the streets , now this Message is FOR YOU :

DO NOT MARTYR YOURSELF FOR THE MOVEMENT.

Anyone that romanticizes your Work. Anyone who fetishizes your Ashé, your Power. Anyone who exploits your Labor. Anyone who will sacrifice You – IS NOT FOR YOU !!!

Do Not Accept Any Harm from Anyone who treats you outside your Inherit Dignity .

As 2020 has taught us , transition and adaptation are essential to continue on in this world . It is with a heavy heart that I am announcing I will be stepping down as community organizer and member of Black Love Resists in the Rust.
Though this news may come as a shock to some of you , I want to remind us all that break ups and departures are a part of nature . As Adrienne Maree Brown said it helps to release attachments to how things should go and embrace when breaking up happens.

I am grateful for the political home I found within BLRR at such a crucial moment personally and nationally . I feel privileged to have been touched by truly talented community organizers that saw me fully and encouraged my growth that led me to becoming the Black Abolitionist I am today. I am thankful for their embodiment of freedom, that they were as passionate about their liberation as they were for the collective of us all. I will carry with me the experiences, numerous trips, lessons from all the teach- ins, political education salons and workshops I was blessed to share with Just Resisting and Black Love Resists in the Rust as I continue my journey towards achieving liberation.


Black Love Resist in the Rust has shown me what is possible in the types of inclusive spaces I, as a queer differently abled Black Person can find solace in this city. I am still committed to continuing building with the communities in this city to define justice and seek it out for themselves.

The way we get free is by freeing ourselves with love and valuing ourselves whole FIRST then let that overflow into our interconnected webs of community.

I love us all . We won’t taste freedom if we keep sacrificing ourselves- That isn’t Liberation.

Liberation is Life Giving and long lasting .
Never forget this .

I look forward to carrying on this movement work with you all.

Remembering Jose

On this day one year ago Jose Hernandez-Rossy was murdered by police officer Tedesco. Jose in death was crucified by media outlets whose platform feed the city lies about who he was and the actions leading to his untimely death. Jose was driving home enjoying the final break in our temper mental Buffalo seasons when he was stopped by the police. The traffic stopped turned violent when one officer reached into Jose’s car causing him to hit a street pole. Jose attempted to leave the scene by getting out of his car to run when he was shot and killed by officer Tedesco. That day and the ones that followed the media reported that he shot a police officer (which was false), that he had a criminal record, that he was smoking weed. The local media’s stance to discredit Jose, the victim of a heinous crime, that by 2017 had played out once in this city before in the case of Meech and dozens of time across this country was an eerie reminder of how American society treats the death of men of color as criminals first before human.

I saw him as human. I saw him in the face of his daughter who still didn’t understand why her father was not returning home as he always did. I saw him as a family man in videos that his cousins’ shared on their social media as they mourned their loss of him. I hear his humanity and his loving kindness in the stories from his brother- in- law of how he helped support him and his sister’s family. I see the strength of him live on in his sister and mother as they fight through a crooked judicial system with lawyers that have other agendas yet they still hold true to their convictions for justice. I have had my heart and soul break open with his family at the place of his death, as we held direct actions and in frustrating meetings.

One particular moment that stays burned in my mind and body’s memory was the day of his memorial at the site of where he was killed. I felt my body shake with sadness, anger, and grief and overwhelmed with hurt when I looked down to see my son crying beside me. Zaire cried because he too felt the overwhelming emotion of when the immediate family came to the pole on the corner of the street where Jose’s car initially crashed and the ground felt radiant of Jose’ blood that was still visible on parts of the street. There was a sad chaos in the street when his mother cried terribly before her body gave way and the male family members had to hold on to her. When the fire department and ambulance pulled up and Zaire began to cry more I decided that it was time for us to go. He asked me why he died and who killed him in the car ride home, I told him because of the color of his skin and by officers that said they were scared of him. My voice trembled as I said this as I felt guilt for exposing this harsh reality to my children. I let it hurt just enough before remembering that taking him and Kelila to Jose’s memorial did not make me a bad parent opening my children up to trauma. I am a parent that is exposing my children to what is happening in our community so that we may heal together and build better sustainable communities for our future.

Now today a year later we will come together once again to remember the life of Jose. We still hold the rage from the not guilty verdict from the Attorney General case in our bones as we reclaim this memorial site. Our emotions are raw on this day and we honor the unspoken power of them that has fueled us this far in our collective journey. My heart is still full despite the pain and I am sending out love in these words, in prayer, and in healing vibes to the survivors of state sanctioned violence.

Remembering Jose

On this day one year ago Jose Hernandez-Rossy was murdered by police officer Tedesco. Jose in death was crucified by media outlets whose platform feed the city lies about who he was and the actions leading to his untimely death. Jose was driving home enjoying the final break in our temper mental Buffalo seasons when he was stopped by the police. The traffic stopped turned violent when one officer reached into Jose’s car causing him to hit a street pole. Jose attempted to leave the scene by getting out of his car to run when he was shot and killed by officer Tedesco. That day and the ones that followed the media reported that he shot a police officer (which was false), that he had a criminal record, that he was smoking weed. The local media’s stance to discredit Jose, the victim of a heinous crime, that by 2017 had played out once in this city before in the case of Meech and dozens of time across this country was an eerie reminder of how American society treats the death of men of color as criminals first before human.

I saw him as human. I saw him in the face of his daughter who still didn’t understand why her father was not returning home as he always did. I saw him as a family man in videos that his cousins’ shared on their social media as they mourned their loss of him. I hear his humanity and his loving kindness in the stories from his brother- in- law of how he helped support him and his sister’s family. I see the strength of him live on in his sister and mother as they fight through a crooked judicial system with lawyers that have other agendas yet they still hold true to their convictions for justice. I have had my heart and soul break open with his family at the place of his death, as we held direct actions and in frustrating meetings.

One particular moment that stays burned in my mind and body’s memory was the day of his memorial at the site of where he was killed. I felt my body shake with sadness, anger, and grief and overwhelmed with hurt when I looked down to see my son crying beside me. Zaire cried because he too felt the overwhelming emotion of when the immediate family came to the pole on the corner of the street where Jose’s car initially crashed and the ground felt radiant of Jose’ blood that was still visible on parts of the street. There was a sad chaos in the street when his mother cried terribly before her body gave way and the male family members had to hold on to her. When the fire department and ambulance pulled up and Zaire began to cry more I decided that it was time for us to go. He asked me why he died and who killed him in the car ride home, I told him because of the color of his skin and by officers that said they were scared of him. My voice trembled as I said this as I felt guilt for exposing this harsh reality to my children. I let it hurt just enough before remembering that taking him and Kelila to Jose’s memorial did not make me a bad parent opening my children up to trauma. I am a parent that is exposing my children to what is happening in our community so that we may heal together and build better sustainable communities for our future.

Now today a year later we will come together once again to remember the life of Jose. We still hold the rage from the not guilty verdict from the Attorney General case in our bones as we reclaim this memorial site. Our emotions are raw on this day and we honor the unspoken power of them that has fueled us this far in our collective journey. My heart is still full despite the pain and I am sending out love in these words, in prayer, and in healing vibes to the survivors of state sanctioned violence.